Advice From Teddy Roosevelt

Advice From Teddy Roosevelt

© GLOW IMAGES
Models used for illustrative purposes

by Don Ingwerson

My Thursday blogs have most often been on some aspect of legislative or media work – and lately most of these blogs have been around the subject of the Affordable Care Act. But today I want to share with you an interesting Christian Science Monitor article about working together – since the government is still working to end the shut down and needs our prayers. The article is titled, “Advice from Teddy Roosevelt as Congress heads toward debt shutdown deal” and is written by Danny Heitman:

To end their political brinkmanship, today’s leaders in Washington need as much good advice as they can find. One promising source of wisdom is Theodore Roosevelt, who left the presidency more than a century ago. Roosevelt led the country from 1901 to 1909, and he’ll get a renewed profile with the November release of “The Bully Pulpit,” the book about his tumultuous times by historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. But lately, instead of Roosevelt’s political battles, I’ve been thinking about his efforts to seek out fellow citizens across party lines, and divisions of class, creed, and culture, too. As the government grapples with shutdown and debt, his thoughts on collegiality and politics, outlined in a January 1900 article for Century Magazine, seem as timely now as when they were first printed. (Read More)

A Higher View of Politics

A Higher View of Politics

© GLOW IMAGES
models used for illustrative purposes

A guest post written by Nicki Garretson

I’m a military brat. I have lived and breathed an air of politics essentially my whole life, especially while living in the Washington, DC area. I even majored in political science. Politics is quite heated in DC, and often what goes on behind the scenes and in the public is ugly. I worked in the State Department for 15 years and had a career in real estate. I found both required me to respect the opinions of others and I often found that I needed to keep my cool when confronted with an angry person on the subject of politics.

Although my grandmother was a Christian Science Practitioner in California, it wasn’t until I was in my late 20’s that I took up the study of Christian Science – after a great aunt sent me a subscription to the Christian Science Monitor. I would come home from work and read the religious article in the Monitor before starting dinner. It became apparent to me that my whole approach to thinking about parties and praying for qualities in candidates had changed. Through the years, I have found that prayer and study of both the Bible and the writings of Mary Baker Eddy are necessary in maintaining an open mind and calmness during an election cycle. I’ll share a couple of ideas.

One particular way I ended up praying was to read Mary Baker Eddy’s chapter in Science and Health on Animal Magnetism every day for a week before an election. Previously, I would argue with people about issues and what actually happened. Later, I found I respected their right to have that view and would quietly assess the situation to see if I should respond at all.

The story of Saul in the Old Testament has really helped me keep my thought focused on issues and ideas not directed to and satisfied by the excitement of personality. Samuel selected Saul after the Israelites cried that they wanted a king and not self-government. Although Saul was a disappointment, David and Solomon soon followed. This political evolution showed me that it wasn’t necessary to be personally tied to any political outcome, but rather to actively trust God more to govern us all.

Another story in the Bible, this time in the New Testament, also helps to remind me that God is in control. Jesus was threatened by an angry mob, which I think is similar to finding myself in a heated political discussion. The crowd carried him along to stone him, but he slipped out of their grasp. How? How does anyone maintain Christian faith, charity, patience, and brotherly love during such violent circumstances? I think I found the answer in the following passage from Mary Baker Eddy: “If one be found who is too blind for instruction, no longer cast your pearls before this state of mortal mind, lest it turn and rend you; but quietly, with benediction and hope, let the unwise pass by, while you walk on in equanimity, and with increased power, patience, and understanding, gained from your forbearance.”

As we come to the final months before elections, I encourage everyone to approach government from the standpoint that God is in control. There is more all of us can share on a Christianly scientific approach to government and our prayers are really needed.

Meeting a Congressman

Meeting a Congressman

photo by Casa Thomas Jefferson

by Don Ingwerson

On Friday, March 16th, our La Canada Assistant Committee, Rahla Lindsey, was able to make an appointment for the two of us to meet with Congressman Adam Schiff in his Pasadena office. We asked him to consider being a co-sponsor of a proposed bill by Congresswoman Judy Biggert and Congressman Dan Boren. Basically, this bill would amend a section of the Internal Revenue Code to provide an additional religious exemption from the individual health coverage mandate and the Christian Science Committee on Publication Federal office has been able to get bipartisan support for this bill. Rahla has supported and maintained contact with Congressman Schiff, which was instrumental to setting up this meeting – when it was important and needed. Congressman Schiff was very courteous and receptive and has also been very supportive of The Christian Science Monitor. The Christian Science Federal office will be following up with him to answer any additional questions he might have concerning his co-sponsorship of this bill. Stay tuned for further updates!

The Beloved Community

 

The Beloved Community

photo by hiroshiken’s photostream

A guest post written by Jeannine Brix

The first time I heard the phrase “beloved community,” it struck a chord in my heart and spoke to me of goodwill and good neighbors. “The beloved community” is a term that was first coined by philosopher-theologian, Josiah Royce, founder of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. But it was Dr. King who popularized the term and invested it with a deeper meaning – meaning which has captured the imagination of people of goodwill all over the world. The beloved community was for him a realistic, achievable goal that could be attained through nonviolence. The creation of such a community would come from reconciliation and redemption; it would transform opponents into friends. He envisioned how love and understanding could bring about miracles in the hearts of men.

Given the thread of this beloved community thinking connected with Dr. King, how appropriate it is that an annual celebration event in his honor features a Community Involvement Fair as an integral component! The fair offers local service groups and non-profits an invaluable opportunity to introduce themselves to the public and share what they have to offer to their beloved community of Santa Monica. Twenty organizations participated this year, with interests ranging from the Santa Monica Symphony to the Women’s International League of Peace and Freedom to the Santa Monica Sister Cities Association to the Westside YWCA.Continue Reading

Man’s Unlimited Ability Continues

Man's Unlimited Ability Continues

Photo illustrated by Secretaria de Comunicaciones

by Don Ingwerson (originally posted October 2010)

A reminder that with ingenuity and courage extraordinary things can happen when people unite together.

Man’s unlimited ability continues to be expressed.  Most recently this unlimited capacity was depicted hourly by the men and women of Chile.  I watched with awe the rescue efforts brought right into my living room—as if I were there in person—and I could not only see a real life drama unfolding before my eyes, but I was connecting with the quiet and dignified prayers of those real-life actors in this life and death scenario.  The support of the rescue effort by the Chilean people inspired support worldwide.  What stirred this involvement?  Many would agree that it started with the thirty-three trapped miners as they looked for an extra-ordinary sense of courage and calm.  From the resilience and courage of the miners to the remarkable rescue effort two thousand feet above them, the miner rescue proves that ingenuity and determination can triumph over a staggering challenge.Continue Reading

Take a Stand

Take a Stand

Photo illustrated by Gleep!

A guest post written by Susan Spears

I never got to see The Beatles in concert while I was growing up – they broke up the year I was born. But like a lot of people, when I was a teenager, I was able to appreciate their music. I am more a fan of their earlier music, while my husband really enjoys their later music. But regardless, while they were performing for their fans, they had a profound effect on society as a whole.

I thought about this effect when I recently read an article detailing the fact that at a time when racial inequality was rampant, they refused to play to a segregated audience. Being that this was in the 1960 when cities were in upheaval due to race riots, this was a bold stand to take – even for a music group that was extremely popular.Continue Reading

The Better Angels of Our Nature

The Better Angels of Our Nature

A guest post written by Robert B. Clark, Committee on Publication for Florida

If the United States of America is still, as Abraham Lincoln proclaimed to a divided nation in 1862, “the last best hope of earth,” then the spiritual health of our nation, looked over by “the better angels of our nature,” would seem pretty important to the world.

That’s why I was interested to read The Christian Science Monitor’s May 2 opinion piece titled, “Celebrating Osama bin Laden’s death is anti-American … and not very biblical”. The author, NYU professor of history and education, Jonathan Zimmerman, tells us,

“By celebrating death, even of someone as evil as bin Laden, we let our worst impulses trump what Abraham Lincoln called “the better angels of our nature.” We look petty, juvenile, and small. We should be worried about that.”Continue Reading

Who Cares? We Do!

Who Cares? We Do!

Beverly Hills from a distance

by Don Ingwerson

The Beverly Hills Christian Science Church recently hosted a meeting on caring for the church family. Topics discussed were media coverage, legislative activity, the visiting nurse program, nursing at Broadview, the Broadview Care facility, and a review of the new Health Care Law. The audience represented a broad base of Christian Scientists from professions including artists, actors, talent agent, and business. One important point made during the visiting nurse service discussion: visiting nurse services are free!

During the presentation, examples were given on how churches care for their communities:Continue Reading

The Monitor: A Trusted News Source

The Monitor: A Trusted News Source

“The Lord gave the word. Great was the company of those that published it.” Psalm 68:11

A guest post written by Susan Y. Berry

The Christian Science Monitor, winner of 7 Pulitzer Prizes, is the news source of choice of my family for three generations. I grew up with the newspaper version, which has now become a wonderful weekly magazine of news and in-depth articles. The Monitor sheds the light of truth on national and world events. Today, I also read The Christian Science Monitor Daily News Briefing.

 

The Monitor is known for its honesty, integrity, and accuracy in reporting the news from the US and around the globe. This enables me to know what needs thoughtful and immediate solutions, especially in times of crisis – as in the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan.Continue Reading