A Healthy Holiday Season

A Healthy Holiday Season

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by Don Ingwerson

Thanksgiving is almost here and Christmas has already made it onto the stores’ shelves. For some this means extra stress and pressure to create that perfect holiday experience. How do we avoid past holiday mistakes and create a healthy and happy holiday?Continue Reading

Gratitude Lifts Mind and Body Over Himalayan Pass

Gratitude Lifts Mind and Body Over Himalayan Pass

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A gratitude-based approach to healthcare has its rewards and my colleague Eric Nelson experienced the benefits it brings when he was trekking through the Himalayan Mountains. Even though the mountains in Southern California aren’t nearly as rigorous, Eric’s message is just as pertinent. I’m sharing an excerpt, and there’s a link below to the full article.

As far as I know, my wife and I had already purchased our tickets to Nepal before grasping entirely what we’d committed to: an 18-day trek through the Himalayas including an ascent up Thorung La – at 5416 meters (17,769 feet), one of the world’s highest mountain passes.

Sure, we had experience hiking to the top of some pretty big hills. But even our one-day trot to the top of California’s Mt. Whitney – the tallest peak in the Lower 48 – couldn’t compare to what was in store for us.

The first few days of the trek were just about as carefree as they come as our small group of adventurers (7 clients, 7 porters, and 2 guides) slowly but surely made our way through the balmy jungles, alpine forests, and hillside rice paddies of the Marsyangdi River valley. However, the closer we came to Thorung La, the more aware I was of the potential health risks involved with high altitude trekking.

To read the rest of the Eric’s article originally titled “Giving Thanks Lifts Mind and Body Over Himalayan Pass” click on this link for Communities @ WashingtonTimes.com.

You can also find him at www.norcalcs.org.

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

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A guest post written by Diana Colarossi from San Juan Capistrano, California.

Is Thanksgiving, a day, a holiday, or a state of mind? Does it matter if we celebrate Thanksgiving among friends, family, or alone?

Thanksgiving isn’t a day. It’s a state of mind giving gratitude to God. Thanks to God shouldn’t be confined to one special day of the year. Nor is it a time that must be spent with people, for joy can also be found in the quiet solitude of God’s presence.

Gratitude isn’t for what we had or have in human things, but to and for the provider of these things, God. God, in the goodness of His love, provides spiritually every idea, and the fruition of it. Therefore, while we are being grateful for the appearance of good in our lives, and this is important, the real denominator is the presence of God. Because God’s presence is universal, we can all be grateful.

Today, and everyday, let every heart unify in gratitude for not only everything we see here on earth that is good, waves in the ocean, blue sky and sun, for smiles from vibrant flowers, glorious creatures of God, for the very basic love of existence, and every perfect thought, but also for the cause and source of this goodness, God. Mary Baker Eddy, a nineteenth century Bible scholar, states these memorable words, “Gratitude and love should abide in every heart each day of all the years.”

This Thanksgiving isn’t a day; it’s a thankful heart, which is full every moment. Come let’s celebrate a day of thanks for His presence!

Article previously published November 22, 2012.

Giving Thanks

Giving Thanks

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A guest post written by B. B. Prest from San Diego, California.

Ready for that turkey dinner this year? And what about giving thanks – will that be on the menu? For many of us it will be. But for others, it may not.

In thinking about giving thanks, I am reminded of the Biblical account from Luke about the ten lepers who were healed, and Christ Jesus’ question to the one (a Samaritan) who returned to give thanks, “Were there not ten cleansed? but where are the nine?”

Good question.

How sad it would be to be counted as one of the “nine” who never returned to give thanks. Let’s face it; this is Christ Jesus we’re talking about.

This passage ties healing to faith and gratitude, according to J. R. Dummelow’s Bible Commentary. Christ Jesus never speaks of healing, but instructs the lepers to “go show themselves to the priests.” Their obedience and faith become instrumental to their healing. And although the nine did not return, I’m sure they were grateful that they were healed. But the Samaritan’s gratitude seemed to exceed that of the others. He took action. He returned. Not just to give thanks to Christ Jesus, but to acknowledge God.

It’s no coincidence that in the next passage the Pharisees question when the Kingdom of God should come. Jesus answers that it does not come with observation, neither “here” nor “there,” but is “within you;” that the Kingdom of God is a spiritual power and source of good already at work in our lives, not simply a physical location, object, or circumstance.

Celebrating Thanksgiving before Christmas and New Year’s seems so fitting and parallels this account and its surrounding passages. It reminds us that faith and gratitude to God can result in blessings and new beginnings in our lives. A faith that can realize the impossible, and gratitude that recognizes the good already present within us, based on our spiritual relationship to God as His expression.

Mary Baker Eddy speaks of this in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, “Are we really grateful for the good already received? Then we shall avail ourselves of the blessings we have, and thus be fitted to receive more.” And on November 29, 1900, when asked by the Boston Globe for a sentiment as to what Thanksgiving should signify, Eddy replied that “divine Love, impartial and universal, as understood in divine Science, forms the coincidence of the human and divine, which fulfils the saying of our great Master, ‘The kingdom of God is within you;’”

So this holiday season, before we open that holiday gift or draft up our New Year’s resolutions, let’s first give gratitude for and have faith in God’s ever-present source of goodness and grace already in our lives, our families’ lives, our communities, and our country. Not only will we have a fulfilling Thanksgiving, but we’ll also experience the true meaning of giving and receiving this Christmas, and realize a spiritual sense of renewal for the coming New Year.

Now that’s something to give thanks about. Happy thanks giving!

Article previously published November 20, 2012

The Feast of Thanksgiving

The Feast of Thanksgiving

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A guest post written by Anne Stearns Condon from Thousand Oaks, California.

Our dinner tables will soon be spread with the bounty of our perennial harvest. It is the great day of shared abundance known to all as Thanksgiving.

Plates will be piled high with favorite dishes amid the usual traditional fare. This is a holiday that all Americans celebrate in unity.

Many will express gratitude to God for their ample provisions. And many have already given generously to those less fortunate. Some will attend a church gathering where they will give thanks for God’s blessings in their life. In a day filled with family and friends, delectable foods, plus afternoon football, this quiet pause sets a tone that honors God.

My goal for this day of celebration is a simple Bible verse. “Whether therefore ye eat or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God” (I Corinthians 10:31). Over-indulgence is a huge temptation at this time of year, so I’m taking St. Paul’s instruction to heart. I’ve found that a little mental preparation through prayer helps strengthen my resolve to be temperate during all the festivities.

I’m giving my self-control an extra boost with these words from a companion book to the Bible: “The divine Mind is the Soul of man, and gives man dominion over all things” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy).

As united compatriots on this day of gratitude, may we offer a blessing together. “Sing unto the Lord with thanksgiving” (Psalms 147:17).

Article previously published November 24, 2011 and originally published in the Ventura County Star.

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

© GLOW IMAGES
model used for illustrative purposes

A guest post written by Diana Colarossi

Is Thanksgiving, a day, a holiday, or a state of mind? Does it matter if we celebrate Thanksgiving among friends, family, or alone?

Thanksgiving isn’t a day. It’s a state of mind giving gratitude to God. Thanks to God shouldn’t be confined to one special day of the year. Nor is it a time that must be spent with people, for joy can also be found in the quiet solitude of God’s presence.

Gratitude isn’t for what we had or have in human things, but to and for the provider of these things, God. God, in the goodness of His love, provides spiritually every idea, and the fruition of it. Therefore, while we are being grateful for the appearance of good in our lives, and this is important, the real denominator is the presence of God. Because God’s presence is universal, we can all be grateful.

Today, and everyday, let every heart unify in gratitude for not only everything we see here on earth that is good, waves in the ocean, blue sky and sun, for smiles from vibrant flowers, glorious creatures of God, for the very basic love of existence, and every perfect thought, but also for the cause and source of this goodness, God. Mary Baker Eddy, a nineteenth century Bible scholar, states these memorable words, “Gratitude and love should abide in every heart each day of all the years.”

This Thanksgiving isn’t a day; it’s a thankful heart, which is full every moment. Come let’s celebrate a day of thanks for His presence!

Giving Thanks

Giving Thanks

© GLOW IMAGES

A guest post written by B. B. Prest

Ready for that turkey dinner this year? And what about giving thanks – will that be on the menu? For many of us it will be. But for others, it may not.

In thinking about giving thanks, I am reminded of the Biblical account from Luke about the ten lepers who were healed, and Christ Jesus’ question to the one (a Samaritan) who returned to give thanks, “Were there not ten cleansed? but where are the nine?”

Good question.

How sad it would be to be counted as one of the “nine” who never returned to give thanks. Let’s face it; this is Christ Jesus we’re talking about.

This passage ties healing to faith and gratitude, according to J. R. Dummelow’s Bible Commentary. Christ Jesus never speaks of healing, but instructs the lepers to “go show themselves to the priests.” Their obedience and faith become instrumental to their healing. And although the nine did not return, I’m sure they were grateful that they were healed. But the Samaritan’s gratitude seemed to exceed that of the others. He took action. He returned. Not just to give thanks to Christ Jesus, but to acknowledge God.

It’s no coincidence that in the next passage the Pharisees question when the Kingdom of God should come. Jesus answers that it does not come with observation, neither “here” nor “there,” but is “within you;” that the Kingdom of God is a spiritual power and source of good already at work in our lives, not simply a physical location, object, or circumstance.

Celebrating Thanksgiving before Christmas and New Year’s seems so fitting and parallels this account and its surrounding passages. It reminds us that faith and gratitude to God can result in blessings and new beginnings in our lives. A faith that can realize the impossible, and gratitude that recognizes the good already present within us, based on our spiritual relationship to God as His expression.

Mary Baker Eddy speaks of this in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, “Are we really grateful for the good already received? Then we shall avail ourselves of the blessings we have, and thus be fitted to receive more.” And on November 29, 1900, when asked by the Boston Globe for a sentiment as to what Thanksgiving should signify, Eddy replied that “divine Love, impartial and universal, as understood in divine Science, forms the coincidence of the human and divine, which fulfils the saying of our great Master, ‘The kingdom of God is within you;’”

So this holiday season, before we open that holiday gift or draft up our New Year’s resolutions, let’s first give gratitude for and have faith in God’s ever-present source of goodness and grace already in our lives, our families’ lives, our communities, and our country. Not only will we have a fulfilling Thanksgiving, but we’ll also experience the true meaning of giving and receiving this Christmas, and realize a spiritual sense of renewal for the coming New Year.

Now that’s something to give thanks about. Happy thanks giving!

In the House of God

 

In the House of God

A guest post written by Sheila Kelly

On a blustery afternoon six days before Thanksgiving I was serving in my local Christian Science Reading Room when I was introduced to a lady near the sales counter who was listening to hymns on earphones.

As she asked for a CD called Jubilation, we discovered that we had a mutual interest in Bel Canto singing. She asked me to sing something, and then I asked her to sing, too. She had an absolutely beautiful voice. She continued to sing along to the CD she was listening to, which I really enjoyed. While she was singing, I went to see what the librarian had prepared for visitors. Among the articles was one in which readers submitted their experiences about memorable Thanksgivings.Continue Reading