2013 Templeton Prize Winner

2013 Templeton Prize Winner

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by Don Ingwerson

In January I posted a blog on previous Templeton Prize winners – people who have affirmed life’s spiritual dimension – and wondered who the 2013 Templeton Prize winner would be. Well, the new winner was awarded April 4 to Desmond Tutu, the former Anglican archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, for his life-long work in advancing spiritual principles such as love and forgiveness, which has helped to liberate people around the world. Tutu combines the theological concept that all people are shaped in the image of God, with the traditional African belief of Ubuntu, which holds that only through others do people achieve humanity. To read more about this important spiritual leader and his contributions, click here: Templeton Prize Current Winner

Looking Forward to a New Templeton Prize Award

Looking Forward to a New Templeton Prize Award

© GLOW IMAGES

by Don Ingwerson

I was recently going back through my blogs and discovered an article, “Renaissance Man,” that highlighted the work of Francisco J. Ayala, the 2010 Templeton Prize winner. What I find so special about the Templeton Prize is that it “honors a living person who has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life’s spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery, or practical works.” Spiritual discoveries are going on individually and personally all the time, but when a discovery allows for a paradigm shift in thought, these discoveries are extremely important. In fact, on the Templeton Prize site, the banner states that it is “celebrating 40 years of spiritual progress.”

The Dalai Lama received this prestigious award last year in 2012. This spiritual leader has been a powerful and outspoken voice promoting the strength of compassion to solve world problems. Other Templeton Prize winners include Martin Rees, a theoretical astrophysicist; Bernard d’Espagnat, physicist and philosopher; Charles Taylor, philosopher; and Charles H. Townes, professor and writer of “The Convergence of Science and Religion.” The prize has been awarded each year since 1973. What I found particularly interesting is that the first Templeton Prize winner was Mother Teresa, who received this prize six years before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. You can take a look at all of the winners and their contributions on the Previous Prize Winners page.

So who will be the 2013 winner – and what contribution will he or she give to furthering the understanding of spirituality? We’ll have to wait until March to see!

Renaissance Man

 

Renaissance Man

Here is an article with a message worth sharing. It is written by Tobi Cohen, Canwest News Service, on March 25, 2010, titled Renasissance man’ of evolutionary biology wins coveted $1.5M Templeton Prize.

Known among scientists as the Renaissance man of evolutionary biology, Francisco J. Ayala has won this year’s prestigious, and lucrative, Templeton Prize for his life’s work trumpeting the notion that science and religion are compatible.

After being named the winner of the world’s largest academic award at a news conference in Washington, D.C., Thursday, the California-based biologist and philosopher described the ever polarizing approaches to life as merely two windows into the same world.Continue Reading