Absolute Faith vs Blind Belief

college kids

© GLOW IMAGES Models used for illustrative purposes

A guest post written by Donna Clifton from Whittier, California.

I vividly remember the first time someone made a disparaging remark to me about the power of prayer to heal. Having been raised as a Christian Scientist, I was used to turning to God in prayer whenever a healing was needed. I took it for granted that my prayers—and those of my parents—would always be effective. As a child, long before I understood much about God’s law that governs us all, I simply trusted that because God is all-good, all powerful, and all-loving, healing would always result from my prayers.

So I was taken by surprise that day when someone I scarcely knew made a sarcastic comment to me about praying for healing. I was a freshman in college and had been planning to go somewhere with a group of friends but at the last minute declined because of a severe headache. A friend in the group who knew I was a Christian Scientist informed the others that I wouldn’t be going with them because I need to stay behind to pray for a healing.

Immediately one of the young men in the group that I had just met spoke up and said, “Well, pray hard!” in a very sarcastic voice. Several of the others laughed at his remark. I didn’t reply, not knowing what to say just then. But I did get healed through prayer that day, just as I had many times before.

Why is it so difficult for some to believe that prayer heals? I think it’s because 1) they don’t know what prayer is, 2) they have been taught that healing results from medical treatment, and 3) they don’t understand that “God is a very present help in trouble” as the Bible states (Psalms 46:1). Christian Scientists have learned that they can certainly trust God, not only with physical problems, but also with any problems that need healing – relationships, employment, bad habits, etc. We also know that it isn’t blind belief that heals. Neither is it repetition of words nor any “magic” phrases that bring healing.

In her book, Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures, Mary Baker Eddy describes prayer as an “absolute faith that all things are possible to God, —a spiritual understanding of Him, an unselfed love.” (S&H 1:2) She distinguishes between absolute faith that is based on an understanding of God’s power to heal and “mere belief” (or blind belief) which denotes no understanding and is not a reliable means of healing.

As a young child, I could put my faith in God through simple trust in His goodness and omnipotence. But as I grew older, I realized that I needed a deeper understanding of God’s healing power. And as I gain this understanding day by day, I continue to have healings. Once after a long cross-country flight, I again faced a debilitating headache that prevented me from even sitting up or eating anything. I asked my sister to read to me from Science & Health, and while I listened, I acquired a better understanding of how God’s law governs me and everyone, and that my health is not precarious.

Suddenly the headache was gone, and I felt strong and completely well. The healing was so instantaneous that it was as if a light switch had been flicked on and light flooded the room, vanquishing the darkness. I realized that listening for messages of healing and accepting them was a form of prayer, and that was what healed me.

This kind of prayer is based on the spiritual understanding of God’s healing power and of our true spiritual nature. And this understanding leads to healing.

Now that I’m wiser about how prayer heals, if I were to meet up with the same guy whose sarcasm had disconcerted me that day in college, I would reassure him that prayer really does heal, and that I am a living testament to that fact. Spiritual healing is the proof of God’s healing power.

Article originally published January 29, 2013

About the author

Guest We are pleased to present Notes from the Field authors, who are assistant committees and church members in the Southern California region; and Notes from The Mother Church authors, who are Committees from the United States and around the world, as well as the Federal Committee on Publication office.

Comments

  1. Diana U says

    I love your list: Why is it so difficult for some to believe that prayer heals? I think it’s because 1) they don’t know what prayer is, 2) they have been taught that healing results from medical treatment, and 3) they don’t understand that “God is a very present help in trouble” as the Bible states (Psalms 46:1). Christian Scientists have learned that they can certainly trust God, not only with physical problems, but also with any problems that need healing – relationships, employment, bad habits, etc. Thanks!

  2. says

    Very well written and explained. I too have been in your position where someone made a sarcastic remark about healing through prayer. But my answer was probably a bit sarcastic in return because as a teenager I was quick to think on my feet. I merely retorted, “Well you know the old saying, ‘If you haven’t tried it, don’t knock it.” That stopped the conversation instantly, but today I think my answer would be a bit more loving. Interesting how we learn over time that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Ha Ha. I think people make those comments because as you said they really don’t know what prayer is and have been educated to believe that matter is real. The world is waking slowly and we just need to be patient with those who don’t understand. Thanks so much for this blog.

  3. sue says

    I have had healings through prayer numerous times. Healings of physical illness and injury, relationships, finding peace when upset, working with students in a teaching situation, driving, sports related, looking for peace when all around me there is confusion etc. God’s goodness is always with me. Trusting that we each are made in God’s image and likeness [see Genesis 1:26,27] and understanding that God is our Father and Mother and only creator help each of us understand goodness and peace as our natural nature. Thank you for this article.

  4. Anne says

    I have found that with people who are not familiar with Christian Science or don’t use prayer for physical healing, it’s good to “be still and know that I am God.” This quietude doesn’t bring on any negative reaction, and I can pray for healing without animosity or criticism from others.

    I actually had this happened once. Not feeling well, I excused myself from a group activity to pray silently. Very quickly I felt the presence of God’s healing power and was completely free from any discomfort. So I rejoined the group and one or two people were amazed at the quickness of my return. One was mildly curious as to what had happened, and so I shared my prayerful experience. The person was quite interested, and we had a stimulating conversation about it.

    Whatever our experience, standing for the truth and relying on God’s infinite ability to always heal is the important thing, as this blog so ably illustrates.

    Thank you.

  5. says

    This article is so beautiful because it points out that 1) we need not think it is unnatural to be healed through prayer and 2) sharing these healings can only bless even in the face of rebuke. For example, someone shared Christian Science with me on a blind date when I was an undergraduate at a large university, and I was favorably impressed with its healing effectiveness. Today I am a class taught student. Since God’s goodness knows no limit, we can expect healing every day.
    Elizabeth A. Nelson